Week Eleven – Special Edition

I realize this is a little off topic but yesterday six of us had the privilege of visiting two unbelievable private collections of cars, trucks, tractors and related toys. There is no way to really describe how impressive these collections are. We walked through about 10 buildings, the size of hockey arenas, filled with these antique, fully restored and functional vehicles. I’m sure there is nothing like this anywhere else in the world.

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Week Eleven – Wednesday

Applying the first of two finish coats

Applying the first of two finish coats

After a light sanding the first top coat was applied. Special attention was paid to the stem areas where the paint has a tendency to run down from the ends of the gains. The roller and brush method of applying the paint worked very well. A team of two on each side of the boat, one rolling, one brushing plus the close scrutiny of three quality control inspectors ensured a top notch job. Monday’s crew will be under pressure when they apply the final coat.

Week Eleven – Monday

Ice breaker on Picton Bay

Ice breaker on Picton Bay

Spring arrived five days ago but looking out over Picton Bay it still looks like we are in the depths of winter. The boat is at least six weeks away from completion so hopefully by then we won’t require the services of the ice breaker when we launch her.

First coat of primer being applied

First coat of primer being applied

After spending the morning going over the hull once more with the random orbital sanders and a detail sander in the tighter spots, we opened up the paint can and applied the first coat of primer. We used a roller to apply the paint and then tipped it off with a brush. We’ll apply a second coat tomorrow and the first finish coat on Wednesday.

We had some visitors from Chaffey’s Locks north of Kingston today. They were very excited to see our boat and we had a long talk discussing all aspects of the project including budget, lumber sources, setup and finishing details. I don’t think we will be the one and only St. Ayles skiff in Canada much longer.

Week Ten – Wednesday

Sanding in preparation for painting next week

Sanding in preparation for painting next week

The hull is now complete, it’s time to put down the carpentry tools and and start the prep work. Screw holes, lap and scarf joints are filled with fairing compound and then sanded with the random orbital or by hand. Next week our painting skills will be put to the test, two coats of primer followed by two finish coats of single part urethane with a light sanding between each.

On Saturday, April 6th a few of us will be attending the Wooden Boat Expo & Seminar Series in Kingston. Between seminars we will be promoting our project in an attempt to get other boats built in our area.   http://www.woodenboatsymposium.com/

Week Ten – Monday

Outer stems and keel attached

Outer stems and keel attached

After fastening the outer stems and keel we turned our attention to getting the hull ready for painting next week. The plank edges were cleaned up and fairing compound was applied to the scarf joints. On Wednesday the stem/keel transitions will be shaped and everything will get a final sanding.

The 13' stroke oar

The 13′ stroke oar

Oar shaft clamped against straight edge

Oar shaft clamped against straight edge

Once our first oar was shaped we felt it was acceptable given the less than perfect lumber. There was, however, a slight curve in the shaft so in order to eliminate that problem on the remaining three oars we are now clamping the laminations against a straight edge on the glueup.

We made the news last week! One of the local newspapers wrote a very enthusiastic article about our project   http://wellingtontimes.ca/?p=8353

In order to look good on the water, in spite of our lack of oarsmanship, we have ordered bright red T-shirts with the Ayle of Quinte Skiff Club logo emblazoned on the front.

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Week Nine

On Week Four we shaped and fitted the inner stems and hog. This week we repeated the process on the outer stems and outer keel. The bevels on the stems and keel were planed on the bench with the hand power plane. The garboard planks were also planed level to create a 2″ wide surface where the keel attaches.

Planing the garboards where the keel attaches

Planing the garboards where the keel attaches

The sides of the keel were shaped on the bench using a hand power plane

The sides of the keel were shaped on the bench using a hand power plane

Checking the fit of the forward stem

Checking the fit of the forward stem

The stem is trimmed flush where the keel will be attached

The stem is trimmed flush where the keel will be attached

We got a start on making the oars this week. Laminations of spruce were glued up to form the 2-1/2″ square loom (shaft) with additional white oak pieces glued to the sides at the blade end. Sourcing lumber for the oars has been very difficult. Our first choice was sitka spruce but availability and cost forced us to look at alternatives. We ended up picking through the construction grade spruce at a local building supply for the straightest and knot-free boards we could find. It will be interesting to see how our first oar turns out.

Sanding the hull using a random orbital sander attached to a shop vac

Sanding the hull using a random orbital sander attached to a shop vac

Week Eight – Wednesday

Today we completed planking the boat, but before showing you that photo we’ll introduce you to the other six members of the boatbuilding crew “The Wednesday Wonkers”.

Greg

Greg

Doug

Doug

Don

Don

Barry

Barry

Jim

Jim

Tony

Tony

After eight weeks we now have something that looks like it will float.

The last planks are hung

The last planks are hung