Well Underway

Stems, frames and hog in place

Stems, frames and hog in place

To make it easier to glue up the planks we built a 22′ x 2′ planking table out of a couple of sheets of plywood and some 2 x 4s. With this setup, two sets of planks could be glued up at once, enabling us to have all the planks done in three days.

Two sets of planks ready for gluing

Two sets of planks ready for gluing

Beveling the Frames 

On Sea Shadow we beveled the frames after they were attached to the molds. This was a tedious job, always having to check and recheck the amount taken off with a batten attached to the molds. This time we wanted to see if we could make it easier by beveling the frames on the bench instead. Using a block of wood the same thickness as the frame and a batten we measured the amount that needed to be removed off the frame at each of the plank landings. Frames #4 & #6 require almost no bevelling but on frames #2 & #8 the bevel increases closer to the sheer. Once the frames were marked, a right-angle grinder with a coarse sanding disk was used to cut the bevel.

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Déjà vu

Picking up the planking kit for the next boat

Picking up the planking kit for the next boat

What a difference a year makes. Last year we kept Sea Shadow on a trailer and launched at different sites in our area. Coordinating the outings was not easy and sometimes we were hard pressed to come up with a full crew. This year the boat is kept on a dolly at the Waupoos Marina and we have two outings each week. Typically 10 to 15 people show up each time, and Sea Shadow will leave the dock 3 to 4 times with a different crew. On Sundays we row 10K around Waupoos Island, trying to beat our previous time. This year also saw a growing interest from the women, their numbers now equal the men and keep increasing. The other development was the very successful change-over to wooden oars from the carbon fibre.

In July we were invited to Lake Champlain for two days of racing at the Lake Champlain Maritime Museum. They put on an outstanding regatta with five St Ayles in attendance, the largest North American gathering to date. The SCR website and the North American St Ayles Association websites both had excellent articles on the event.

http://scottishcoastalrowing.org/2014/07/17/meanwhile-on-lake-champlain/

http://www.skiffies.org

With both the interest and the number of participants growing, there was only one way to meet the demand, and that was to build a second boat. Work got started a few weeks ago with the fabrication of the stems and setting up the building frame and molds. Another set of wooden oars are nearing completion and might be ready in time for sea trials before this season ends. Today we picked up the planking kit and the lumber for the inner and outer keels. Tomorrow we will cut out the planks and clean them up in preparation for gluing. In another week week we’ll be hanging planks.

We’re all looking forward to next year with two Canadian boats on the water.

Two Guys, Two Dories

TGTD-Home

Don and Chris, two members of the group that built Sea Shadow have teamed up to build a pair of 16′ Amberjack dories. Things got started in Don’s shop making the component parts – stems, transoms, frames and moulds. Next it’s over to Chris’s shop to set everything up and plank the hulls. One hull will stay at Chris’s and the other goes to Don’s for completion – gunnels, seat risers, thwarts and finishing.

You can follow the progress on their blog “Two Guys, Two Dories” at:

http://onpictonbay.wordpress.com

 

 

Oars Continued

OarConstruction

The blades were constructed of 3/8″ marine plywood and then edge-banded with white ash to protect and seal the edges. To add strength, pine was glued to the back and shaped to form the spine. The oars will certainly be ready for the upcoming season which unfortunately doesn’t look like it will be anytime soon. We’ll have to wait for the 18″ of ice covering the bay to thaw before we can try them out.

The oarmakers: Bob and Sandy

The oarmakers: Bob and Sandy

Winter Oars

Sandy and Bob gluing up the first oar

Sandy and Bob gluing up the first oar

We are in the depths of our Canadian winter, a good time to hunker down in our workshops and wait until the next rowing season arrives. Unfortunately that doesn’t happen until May in this neck of the woods. Two of our group are keeping busy building a set of regulation wooden oars for Sea Shadow. Sandy spent a lot of time thinking, researching and drawing up a set of plans. The oars will have hollow looms made up of laminated ash and pine strips. The blades will be made of 3/8″ marine plywood and the handles carved from basswood. After sourcing the lumber and machining it to the various dimensions, including tapers, Sandy and Bob got started yesterday gluing up the first oar.

A Great Finish to Season One

Rigging the coxed touring quads

Rigging the coxed touring quads

The Quinte Rowing Club and Ontario Adventure Rowing invited us to join them in the “Icicle Chase”, an end-of-season half-marathon on the Otonabee River, from Peterborough to Campbellton. There were seven crews rowing coxed touring quads: one from Belleville, four from Toronto and two from Ottawa plus our crew in Sea Shadow. After unloading boats at the start, cars and trailers were jockeyed to the finish, while crews rigged and launched the boats. Timed starts, in head race fashion, saw Sea Shadow on the course first. After a few kilometers the first of the quads appeared behind us and gradually overtook us followed by the others throughout the race. Despite getting to the finish line last, we completed the 23K course in a respectable 2-1/2 hours, only 20 minutes behind the last of the quads. Congratulations to the winning crew, I understand they set a course record!

During the race we discovered that Sea Shadow had one distinct advantage over the quads, making crew changes on the water. We made five changes, giving everyone a chance to sit back and relax in the cox seat. Not so easy in the quads! It was quite a sight to see a crew member walking the gunnels on all fours over the other crew as they lay back in their seats (sorry I didn’t get a photo).

We thoroughly enjoyed the outing and were most impressed with how well the event was organized. From start to finish nothing was overlooked. A BBQ at the end was a great opportunity to meet some of the other crews before we headed home to nurse our aching muscles.

On behalf of the Sea Shadow crew I would very much like to thank Arnold Vandermeer and Maxine Walker of the Quinte Rowing Club and also Ontario Adventure Rowing for including us in this event.  

What did it cost to build Sea Shadow?

How she looked at the beginning of April

How she looked at the beginning of April

THE KIT
The St Ayles Skiff Kit including shipping, handling and HST sales tax
$3,550 

LUMBER (please see SCR website for material dimensions and quantity)
The building frame was constructed of 2 sheets of 5/8” spuce plywood, cut into strips and laminated
The hog was one piece of Douglas fir
Stems, keel, cox seat, breasthooks and tiller handle were white oak
Ash wood was used for the inside and outside gunnels plus the spacer blocks
Floorboards were made of Western red cedar planned to 5/8” thick
Note: U.S. kit includes rudder and thwarts
$500

EPOXY
Two gallons of West System epoxy
Additives included 403 Microfibers Adhesive Filler and 410 Microlight Fairing Filler
Other supplies: pumps, acetone, mixing pots, disposable brushes, gloves, masks
$550

PAINT & VARNISH
One gallon Interlux Brightside Primer (not quite enough for two coats, inside and out)
Two quarts of Brightside One-Part Polyurethane (two coats outside)
One quart Brightside One-Part Polyurethane and one quart flattening agent (two coats inside)
Two quarts Sikkens Cetol Marine Natural Finish (lots left over for next year’s touch-up)
Other supplies: sanding disks, sandpaper, brushes, thinners, tape
$525

FITTINGS and FASTENERS
Permanent silicon bronze screws were used at each plank end, cox seat slats, floorboards and along the removable outer gunnel. A few stainless bolts were used to attach rudder fittings, tiller, footstretchers and bow eye.
Stainless rudder fittings (Holt Allen 3/8″ pintles and RWO strap gudgeons) and a bow eye
$325

MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS
Bow and stern lines, fenders, safety kit, trailer tie down straps, flag, etc.
$275

OARS and OARLOCKS
Five carbon Macon sweep oars and Concept2 oarlocks
Donated

TOTAL COST TO BUILD SEA SHADOW
$5,725

LABOUR
It took 5 months and appoximately 800 – 1,000 hours to complete the boat and trailer.

Our custom designed trailer

Our custom designed trailer

TRAILER
We were very fortunate to have the expertise and equipment to build our own trailer.
Cost includes: spare tire and swivel jack
$1,100 (material costs)

August Agenda

On Picton Bay

On Picton Bay

This month is all about promoting the boat with the hope of having a sister ship built this coming winter. Getting people out on the water and letting them experience first hand the fun of rowing such a fine craft is proving to be very successful. Weather conditions don’t hamper the enthusiasm. Last week we rowed into Picton harbour on a beautiful day, sunny, warm and a light breeze. Yesterday, on South Bay, the winds were gusting to up to 26 knots with a two foot chop, which only added to the excitement.

On South Bay

On South Bay

Getting ready to launch

Getting ready to launch

Prince Edward Bay Row

A perfect day for a row

A perfect day for a row

We launched Sea Shadow on the Black River and rowed a short distance to the open water of Prince Edward Bay. Unlike last week’s row in the extreme heat, today’s weather was perfect, comfortable temperature, nice breeze and the sun sparkling off the water. Sea Shadow felt more at home on the choppy waters we encountered today than the usual flat water conditions we row on.

Out on Prince Edward Bay – Photo by Carolyn Van Dijk

Out on Prince Edward Bay – Photo by Carolyn Van Dijk

Marilyn at the helm

Marilyn at the helm